Five Great Ways to Open a Blog Post

0 comments, 29/10/2012, by , in General

When it comes to the never-ending amount of information available on the internet, you may only have a small window of opportunity to draw in your readers. While many emphasize the need to have a catchy blog post title, it is equally important to make sure your opening paragraph is both alluring and well-developed. If you have been receiving mixed reviews lately – in both comments and metrics – then you may want to consider revamping your approach. We have put together five great ways that you can open a blog post, making it far more likely that your readers will finish the article and continue to visit your blog.

Present A Question

Generally, readers are looking for an answer. If said reader is able to determine what exact question is being answered in the article, then you stand a greater chance at retaining their eyes through the end of the article. You can often use such a question in a rhetorical sense, which will spark the reader’s mind into considering more possibilities and therefore, make them more likely to continue reading. Those who manage to engage the minds of their readers by provoking previously unquestioned ideas can gain their trust and respect.

Lay Out The Data

It is never a bad idea to include a statistic or piece of data in your opening paragraph, as this can subconsciously give the reader the impression that you are knowledgeable and informed in the subject in question. Obviously, the data should be relevant to the topic at hand, but you can be creative in the specific set of data that you wish to cite. You want to make sure that the data being provided is also unique; a generic piece of data may not entice readers in the same way as an exciting, unknown statistic can.

Get Personal

Whenever a writer shares intimate or personal details about his or her life with the reader, that can create a bond – at least within the confines of the article – that gives the reader a little bit more information about your experience with the topic in question. You can also use this as an opportunity to share a quote or story about a subject of the article, as opposed to a personal anecdote. For example, your anecdotes on Mother Teresa might not be as valuable as a quote directly from the source.

Make Them Imagine

Using words that invoke imagery can be a grand slam when it comes to getting a reader to follow through with your blog post. By encouraging the reader to think (“Where were you when”, “Do you remember”, “picture this scenario”, etc.), you can develop a subconscious sense of rapport with the reader. Tip: Want to “imagine” what your blog post will look like? Use Pingler’s Search Engine Listing Preview Tool to get an idea.

Using Similes and Metaphors

This tactic is an age-old writer’s tool: by using similes and metaphors, you engage the reader’s creative mind and get them to be more open to suggestive content. Especially good when attempting to sell a product or convince the reader that they should use a particular service, the usage of similes and metaphors not only make your chances of doing so more likely but they also give your article a better and more mature structure.

When it comes to the never-ending amount of information available on the internet, you may only have a small window of opportunity to draw in your readers. While many emphasize the need to have a catchy blog post title, it is equally important to make sure your opening paragraph is both alluring and well-developed. If you have been receiving mixed reviews lately – in both comments and metrics – then you may want to consider revamping your approach. We have put together five great ways that you can open a blog post, making it far more likely that your readers will finish the article and continue to visit your blog.

Present A Question

Generally, readers are looking for an answer. If said reader is able to determine what exact question is being answered in the article, then you stand a greater chance at retaining their eyes through the end of the article. You can often use such a question in a rhetorical sense, which will spark the reader’s mind into considering more possibilities and therefore, make them more likely to continue reading. Those who manage to engage the minds of their readers by provoking previously unquestioned ideas can gain their trust and respect.

Lay Out The Data

It is never a bad idea to include a statistic or piece of data in your opening paragraph, as this can subconsciously give the reader the impression that you are knowledgeable and informed in the subject in question. Obviously, the data should be relevant to the topic at hand, but you can be creative in the specific set of data that you wish to cite. You want to make sure that the data being provided is also unique; a generic piece of data may not entice readers in the same way as an exciting, unknown statistic can.

Get Personal

Whenever a writer shares intimate or personal details about his or her life with the reader, that can create a bond – at least within the confines of the article – that gives the reader a little bit more information about your experience with the topic in question. You can also use this as an opportunity to share a quote or story about a subject of the article, as opposed to a personal anecdote. For example, your anecdotes on Mother Teresa might not be as valuable as a quote directly from the source.

Make Them Imagine

Using words that invoke imagery can be a grand slam when it comes to getting a reader to follow through with your blog post. By encouraging the reader to think (“Where were you when”, “Do you remember”, “picture this scenario”, etc.), you can develop a subconscious sense of rapport with the reader. Tip: Want to “imagine” what your blog post will look like? Use Pingler’s Search Engine Listing Preview Tool to get an idea.

Using Similes and Metaphors

This tactic is an age-old writer’s tool: by using similes and metaphors, you engage the reader’s creative mind and get them to be more open to suggestive content. Especially good when attempting to sell a product or convince the reader that they should use a particular service, the usage of similes and metaphors not only make your chances of doing so more likely but they also give your article a better and more mature structure.






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